Tom Blackwell
18th April 2008 | Some thoughts
2007 and 2008 have been very exciting years. My wife, Linda, and I traveled to Paris for the opening of my solo show in Paris at the Patrice Trigano Gallery which ran from November thru January 2007. Then, a few months later we flew off to Zurich to take part in the Zurich Project, the first of two exciting art projects organized by German art collector Torsten Prochnow and the Louis K Meisel Gallery. I got some wonderful material from this trip and most of the rest of the year was spent hard at work in my studio in upstate New York. The first large painting, Martina’s Porsche was completed in the fall of 2007 and the second painting is nearing completion here in my winter studio in Florida. Then, in May, I will be off to Monaco for the second on these two wonderful international art projects.
16th April 2008 | Monaco Project May 2008
The Monaco Project is to be realized in Monte Carlo and its surroundings from May 22nd to 28th, 2008. Reputed photorealists from the USA and Germany will be creating photographic material in the city itself, its surroundings and at the Formula 1 Race itself during this period. These objects will then be transformed into paintings containing photorealistic works of art subsequent to our stay. The project will take place against the backdrop of previous projects of an equivalent profile. Conceptually, the project is oriented along the lines of the "Prague Project", which took place in the spring of 2005, and the "Zurich Project" carried out in the spring of 2007. The following are the 8 artists who will take part in the Monaco Project: Roberto Bernardi, Tom Blackwell, Anthony Brunelli, Clive Head, Robert Gniewek, Ron Kleemann, Bertrand Meniel and Raphaella Spence.

16th April 2008 | Exhibition Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin 2009
The Deutsche Guggenheim in Berlin is planning an exhibition opening February of 2009 that will feature the seminal work of the twelve first generation photorealist painters. Three of my early works will be featured in this exhibition.
15th April 2008 | Exhibition of Metaphorical Paintings
In October of 2008 a solo exhibition of the Metaphorical Paintings will open in Henniker New Hampshire with plans for the show to travel to other New England venues.
Biography
Born
Chicago, IL, 1938
 
Teaching
1978 _ Keene State College, Keene, NH, Guest Professor, Summer
1980 _ Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, Artist in Residence, Fall
1981 _ University of Arizona, Tucson, Artist in Residence, March
1985-89 _ School of Visual Arts, New York, NY
 
Grants and Awards
1986 _ New Hampshire State Council on the Arts, Individual Artist Award
1986 _ American Academy & Institute of Arts and Letters, purchase award
1990 _ Awards Panel, New Hampshire State Council on the Arts
1998 _ New York State Council of the Arts, Individual Artist’s Grant


Solo Exhibitions

2006
- Brauer Museum of Art, Valparaiso, Indiana, Dec 12 - March 27, 2007
- Galerie Patrice Trigano,Paris, France, Nov. 29 - Jan. 6, 2007

2004
- Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY, April 10 - May 1

2002
- Eckert Fine Art, Naples, FL, April 1-April 30

1999
- Gallery Camino Real, Boca Raton, FL, Feb. 11-March 11
- Roxbury Center for the Arts, Roxbury, NY, Sponsored by the New York State Council of the Arts
- Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY, October 2-30

1995
- Gallery Camino Real, Boca Raton, FL, April 6-29

1989
- Galerie Ninety-Nine, Bar Harbor Islands, FL

1988
- Carlo Lamagna Gallery, New York, NY

1986
- Carlo Lamagna Gallery, New York, NY

1985
- The Currier Gallery of Art, Manchester, NH

1982
- Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY, November 6-27

1981
- University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson, AZ

1980
- Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY
- Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

1977
- Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY

1976
- Galerie Le Portail, Heidelberg, West Germany

1975
- Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, NY
- Morgan Gallery, Shawnee Mission, KS

1964
- Orange Coast College Museum, Santa Ana, CA

1962
- Rex Evans Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

1961
- Roy Parsons Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
- "Urban Landscapes" Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY, March 2-23


Public Collections

Archer M. Huntington Art Gallery, University Of Texas, Austin, TX
Ball State University Art Gallery, Muncie, IN
Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, TX
Byer Museum of the Arts, Evanston, IL
Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, Racine, WI
Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, MI
Duke University Museum of Art, Durham, NC
Dwight Frederic Boyden Gallery, St. Mary's College, St. Mary's City, MD
East Gallery, College of Eastern Utah
Elvehjem Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, IN
Grand Rapids Museum of Art, MI
James Madison University, School of Art and Art History, Harrisonburg, VA
Jamestown Community college, Jamestown, NY
Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
Hofstra Museum, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
Lakeview Museum of Arts and Sciences, Peoria, IL
Macalester College, St. Paul, MN
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, NY
Pieper Power, Milwaukee, WI
Queensborough Community College Art Gallery, Queens, NY
Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art
Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, GA
Sentra Museum, Berardo Collection, Lisbon, Portugal
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Sordoni Art Gallery, Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre, PA
South Texas Institute for the Arts, Corpus Christi, TX
State University of New York Plattsburgh, Art Museum, Plattsburgh, NY
The Currier Gallery of Art, Manchester, NH
The Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
The Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, NJ
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY
The Phoenix Museum of Art, Phoenix, AZ
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY
The Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY
Tucson Museum of Art, Tucson, AZ
The University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson, AZ
The Virlane Foundation and The K&B Corporation Collections, New Orleans, LA
Philosophy
Artist’s Statement
We were all brought up to believe that copying is cheating. There is an irony in the fact that as a Photorealist my time is spent in a form of copying. Far from cheating, I have discovered that translating the image from the photograph requires the most intense discipline and that limiting the arena of self-expression also refines it. Working from the photograph requires a new kind of invention—an invention of means rather than of forms. The photograph is a tool which enables me to freeze the 'ordinariness" I am after, one which helps me to achieve the veracity that makes it possible to capture the ineffable in the commonplace.
 
Nailing down that precise moment, the optimum moment that best sums up a visual event, and then bringing it to the highest level of expression I can – that’s what these paintings are all about. I shoot my pictures with high-speed film, mostly out of doors in real-life situations. When I began these paintings in the late 1960s, I saw the modem world, vulgar, impersonal and machine-made, as a sort of virgin territory—one that the camera makes accessible.
 
My first Photo-Realist paintings were of highly customized bikes from motorcycle magazine photographs. At that point in my career, after a good many years as an abstract painter, I was doing Pop-influenced work, juxtaposing photographic images in irrational and poetic ways. One of these paintings had an image of a section of a motorcycle engine. As I worked on the painting it came to me that I could just paint that, and throw out all the other imagery—the juxtapositions, associations, and allegorical elements. The image could speak for itself without my manipulation.
 
The various pipes, sprockets, bars, etc., were so complex that it was almost like looking at an abstract painting. I was fascinated by the play of light on the chrome surfaces and by the way the light modified the shapes and your perception of the metal. It became apparent to me almost immediately that the magazine photographs were not adequate to my needs. They didn't allow me enough choice: my purposes were different. A lot of detail was lost in the cheap half-tone reproductions; there was no subtlety. I wanted to see some real chrome. I went to a Rod and Cycle Show at the New York Coliseum where they had hundreds of bikes and cars on display, and I shot pictures for hours. My work for the next couple of years came from that day. As the work evolved, these initial efforts, which were still directly related to abstract painting, gave way to a more straightforward approach to representationalism, in some ways more traditional, in other ways more radical.
 
Eventually I moved outside and began photographing bikes, and then airplanes, as part of their natural environment, and this led the way to the store windows, which became a major, compelling interest.
 
A common element in all of my painting is the reflective surface. Each type of hard or shiny surface—chrome, stainless steel, plastic, plate glass—reflects light differently. These differences are multiplied by variations in color and value and by the environment and the type of light which is reflected. The camera records these reflections at a moment frozen in time, transcribing and interpreting it according to its own laws. In my painting I am dealing with a twofold reality: light and its translation on film.
 
Another important aspect of reflective surfaces is that they expand the space depicted to include things actually outside the scene encompassed by the canvas. A tail pipe, or a car mirror, for example, will reflect things in front of them which are behind (or, depending on the angle, to the side of) the person taking the picture. A fascinating aspect of this is that the shape of the reflective object will distort whatever is reflected at the same time that this distortion will describe the shape of the reflective surface.
 
The spatial complexities of plate glass windows when captured by the camera are infinite. The reflections that appear on the glass war with its transparency so that things in the window display often fuse and seem to melt into the objects outside being reflected. When interior light predominates the reflections recede; when there is less interior light the reflections become more evident.
 
The awareness of the depth of the space both in front of and behind you coexist. The result is a visual, perceptual tension between the flatness of the picture plane created by the plate glass and the awareness of the space both inside the store and reflected on the window. The real space and the illusion of space caught by the glass contradict each other and therefore flatten each other out. So you have the illusion of flatness and space at once. As cars go by and people move everything shifts. The effect is like counterpoint in music, and when choosing a slide to paint I look for the richest example of this.
 
It isn’t just the world we live in that I am interested in depicting but also our method of recording and perceiving it—the photograph itself. More than just a means of capturing the image, the photograph is part of the subject of the painting. We are so inundated with photographs in one form or another—movies, TV, newspapers, Internet, etc.—that what a camera does to reality has become a kind of reality itself. We see photographically. This photographic vocabulary is very much a part of my painting.
 
The camera enables me to confront freshly, as if seen for the first time, not only particular scenes, but also views and viewpoints we take for granted. Several of my paintings, for example, are based on photos taken out of car windows, through the windshield or out the side window. These compositions are determined by the way both the film and the vehicle frame reality. The illusion in these paintings is made up of shapes and forms which are cropped in ways that would be "unreadable" except that our eyes have been educated by the media to instantly grasp this kind of cropping. This is also true of the differences in focus between background and foreground.
 
One reason I often employ large scale is that it affords me the space to really get in and paint the specific ways in which light breaks across a surface. In areas of great contrast there is a kind of "buffer zone" and the film will handle this by showing a slight edge of spectrum color before making the transition from dark to light. By using this in my painting I am making a direct reference to the photograph because the eye will perceive this only under extreme circumstances. Ironically, the more photographic the painting becomes the more "real" it seems, even though the photograph itself is unreal.
 
A great range of possibilities exists in paint handling when working from a photographic source, all the way from a completely airbrushed treatment on a highly polished surface (total photographic mimesis) to an expressive use of brush strokes. I don't try to hide brushstrokes and gestures in my work, although I don't want the viewer to be particularly aware of them either. Up close I want my work to have a painterly integrity; each area must be brought to the same degree of realization. You are aware of the fact that the image consists of areas of paint of various hues and values and intensities put down in a particular manner. I build the image using primarily thin washes of transparent paint. I make as much use of transparent colors as possible to attain the greatest luminosity. For me, the richest possibilities exist in a dialogue between opaque and translucent areas.
 
I like the idea that up close you are aware of the artist’s hand. The illusion is actually "put together" in the eyes of the viewer, and this occurs at some distance from the canvas. The visual response of the viewer completes the equation.
 
Painting a Photo-Realist painting is a humbling and self-limiting experience: instead of personal angst you have patient observation. Each of these paintings requires months to complete. You are detached from the connotations of the particular object you are painting, but passionately involved in the painting of that object. Yet clearly no image is without meaning. The motorcycle is fascinating not only visually but also as a highly anthropomorphic piece of machinery. A painting of a motorcycle, a store window, a race car, or an airplane is, in one sense, highly impersonal, but the experience of painting it becomes very personal, and the humanity which created these things is always present.
 
It may seem absurd to painstakingly reproduce by hand the information gained instantaneously with the click of a shutter, but the painting achieves a reality of its own, one that is an amalgam of three separate realities – the original subject, the photograph of it, and the artist’s translation. To paint each area is to make it your own. No matter how precisely you may record the photographic information you consciously and unconsciously bring to it your knowledge of how things look and are. Painting is a way of appropriating and also embracing reality. If a photograph is a kind of assassination, as Susan Sontag suggests in her classic book, the painting of it is an act of love. It creates intimacy for the artist and the viewer.
Image as Metaphor
In my Photorealist work my goal is to reveal something about the actual world and to explore our photo-mediated perceptions of it. In my more interpretive works, I use juxtaposed, overlapping and spliced images, often combined with constructed elements and actual objects, in ways that are deliberately emotionally and visually provocative. I employ imagery to challenge intellectual and emotional expectations, and to challenge as well modernist and post-modernist expectations concerning realism, subject matter and art/life dichotomies.

These paintings are all about contrast: urban and rural, ancient and modern. Language and mark-making are central concerns. Often I employ letters as spatial dividers. In the Millennium Series the bold “Ms” of the Roman numeral fill the canvases, edge to edge so that the letters themselves become architectural and iconic. The spaces the letters define are employed in various ways—as positive and negative space, as a method of interweaving the ancient and modern images, and as a veil or scrim through which another world is revealed or through which the juxtaposition is made. In these diptychs the M operates as an arbitrary demarcation of space in much the way that a millennium is an arbitrary demarcation of time, yet one that is tremendously evocative for our collective unconscious.

In several of these paintings I employ images of Mayan structures and friezes which are interspersed with and fragmented by images derived from contemporary computer technology, creating a dialogue between the ancient, highly visual language of the hieroglyphs and the modern abstract language of the binary code.

Thematically, these paintings address the relationship between contemporary humanity and the universe we inhabit. They employ ancient and modern structures and mark making as paradigms of perception and experience. My intention is to create a visual dialogue between past and present which both echoes and contributes to our dialogue with history.
Works in Progress
Photorealist paintings
70s
80s
90s
The New Century
Metaphorical paintings
Metaphorical paintings
Exhibitionsback to menu
Solo Exhibitions

2006
- Brauer Museum of Art, Valparaiso, Indiana, Dec 12 - March 27, 2007
- Galerie Patrice Trigano,Paris, France, Nov. 29 - Jan. 6, 2007

2004
- Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY, April 10 - May 1

2002
- Eckert Fine Art, Naples, FL, April 1-April 30

1999
- Gallery Camino Real, Boca Raton, FL, Feb. 11-March 11
- Roxbury Center for the Arts, Roxbury, NY, Sponsored by the New York State Council of the Arts
- Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY, October 2-30

1995
- Gallery Camino Real, Boca Raton, FL, April 6-29

1989
- Galerie Ninety-Nine, Bar Harbor Islands, FL

1988
- Carlo Lamagna Gallery, New York, NY

1986
- Carlo Lamagna Gallery, New York, NY

1985
- The Currier Gallery of Art, Manchester, NH

1982
- Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY, November 6-27

1981
- University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson, AZ

1980
- Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY
- Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

1977
- Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY

1976
- Galerie Le Portail, Heidelberg, West Germany

1975
- Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, NY
- Morgan Gallery, Shawnee Mission, KS

1964
- Orange Coast College Museum, Santa Ana, CA

1962
- Rex Evans Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

1961
- Roy Parsons Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
- "Urban Landscapes" Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, NY, March 2-23


Public Collections

Archer M. Huntington Art Gallery, University Of Texas, Austin, TX
Ball State University Art Gallery, Muncie, IN
Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, TX
Byer Museum of the Arts, Evanston, IL
Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, Racine, WI
Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, MI
Duke University Museum of Art, Durham, NC
Dwight Frederic Boyden Gallery, St. Mary's College, St. Mary's City, MD
East Gallery, College of Eastern Utah
Elvehjem Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, IN
Grand Rapids Museum of Art, MI
James Madison University, School of Art and Art History, Harrisonburg, VA
Jamestown Community college, Jamestown, NY
Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
Hofstra Museum, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
Lakeview Museum of Arts and Sciences, Peoria, IL
Macalester College, St. Paul, MN
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, NY
Pieper Power, Milwaukee, WI
Queensborough Community College Art Gallery, Queens, NY
Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art
Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, GA
Sentra Museum, Berardo Collection, Lisbon, Portugal
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Sordoni Art Gallery, Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre, PA
South Texas Institute for the Arts, Corpus Christi, TX
State University of New York Plattsburgh, Art Museum, Plattsburgh, NY
The Currier Gallery of Art, Manchester, NH
The Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
The Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, NJ
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY
The Phoenix Museum of Art, Phoenix, AZ
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY
The Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY
Tucson Museum of Art, Tucson, AZ
The University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson, AZ
The Virlane Foundation and The K&B Corporation Collections, New Orleans, LA
Bibliographyback to menu
Books
Selected Books

2007
- Segal, Richard D. and Monica M., Contemporary Realism: The Seavest Collection, Collectors Press, Portland, OR
- Chase, Linda, Photorealist Watercolors: The PieperPower Collection, pp. 21-22.

2004
- Cempellin, Leda. "L'Iperrealismo Fotografico" Americano in Pittura. Padua, Italy: Coop. Libraria Editrice Università di Padova, p. 218

2002
- Meisel, Louis K. & Chase, Linda, Photorealism at the Millennium. New York: Harry N. Abrams, pp. 57-64 and cover illustration

2001
- Sima Suárez, Carmen de, and Ana Vásquez de la Cueva. Aeronáutica y Pintura - Aeronautics and Painting, Madrid: Aena, p. 209

1999
- Ferrier, Jean-Louis, ed. Art of the Twentieth century: A year by Year Chronicle of Painting, Architecture and culpture, Pairs, Editions du Chêne

1996
- Huber, Tobias. Autokauf. Germany: Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag & Carl Heymanns Verlag, cover illustration

1994
- The Fine Art Index, Volume I, Chicago: International Art Reference, pp. 49

1993
- Meisel, Louis K. Photorealism since 1980, New York: Harry N. Abrams, pp. 77-94

1992
- Betti, Claudia, Sale, Teel. Drawing: A Contemporary Approach, 3rd ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Publishers, pp. 62-63.

1989
- Ward, John L. American Realist Painting 1945-1980, UMI Research Press, Ann Arbor, MI, pp.268, 270, 316-319 (Illustrated), 272, 276, 289, 313, 321, 338

1988
- Krantz, Les. The New York Art Review, American References, Inc., Chicago, pp.130, 761

1986
- Martin, Alvin. American Realism-20th Century Drawings and Watercolors, (the Glenn C. Janss Collection), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, CA, in association with Harry N. Abrams, Inc., New York, Illustration p.198, pp.128, 168, 207
- Finch, Christopher. American Watercolors, Abbeville Press Publishers, New York, pp.291, 293 illustrated

1985
- Krantz, Les. American Art Galleries, Facts on File Publications, New York, p.211

1984
- Who's Who in America, 43rd Edition, Marquis Who's Who, Inc., Chicago

1982
- Krantz, Les. The New York Art Review, The Krantz Company, New York, Illustration
- Who's Who in America, 42nd Edition, Marquis Who's Who, Inc., Chicago

1980
- Meisel, Louis K. Photorealism, Harry N. Abrams, New York, pp.11, 14, 15, 16, 18, 23, 24, 25, 55, 83-108
- Lindy, Christine. Superrealist Painting and Sculpture, William Morrow Company, Inc., New York

1979
- Lucie-Smith, Edward. Super Realism, Phaidon, Oxford, England, Illustration
- Seeman, Helene Zucker, and Siegfried, Alanna. SoHo, Neal-Schuman, New York
- Beginning Drawing: A Contemporary Approach, Holt, Rhinehart & Winston, New York, Illustration

1978
- Krantz, Les. The New York Art Review, The Krantz Company, New York
- Tubbs, D.B. Art and the Automobile, Grosset & Dunlap, New York, pp.132, 136

1977
- Battcock, Gregory. Why Art, E.P. Dutton, New York, Illustration

1976
- Who's Who in American Art, R.R. Bowker, New York

1975
- Chase, Linda. Hyperrealisme, Rizzoli, New York, Illustration
- Battcock, Gregory. Super Realism, A Critical Anthology, E.P. Dutton, New York, Illustration
- Rose, Barbara. Readings in American Art, 1900-1975, Praeger, New York
- Kultermann, Udo. Neue Formen des Bildes, Verlag Ernst Wasmuth, Tubingen, West Germany

1974
- Calamandrei, Mauro, and Gorgoni, Gianfranco. Art U.S.A, Fratelli Fabbri Editori, Milan, Italy

1973
- Brachot, Isy. Hyperrealisme, Imprimeries F. Van Buggenhoudt, Brussels, Belgium
- Sager, Peter. Neue Formen des Realismus, Verlag M. DuMont Schauberg, Cologne, West Germany
- Who's Who in American Art, R.R. Bowker, New York

1968
- Houston, Jean, and Masters, Robert. Psychedelic Art, Grove Press, New York, Illustration
Articles
Selected Articles

2005
- Blackwell, Tom. "Lèche-vitrines", Numero Magazine, Paris, France, March issue, illustrations.

2001
- "Amerikanske Ikoner," Samvirke, Albertslund, Denmark, August 28, illustration
- Sandbye, Mette. "Spejlverdener," Weekend Avisen, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 28, illustration
- Grubach, Carsten B. "Det er Altså Også Amerika," Jydske Vestkysten, Haderslev, Denmark, September 22, illustration

2000
- Gisbourne, Mark. "Oculus Imaginationis: Taking the Real Out of Photorealism," Contemporary Visual Arts, London, England, Issue 31, pp. 46-47
- Gladstone, Valerie. "Tom Blackwell," ARTnews, NY, Volume 90, No. 2, February, p. 165.

1999
- "Tom Blackwell, Odalisque Express," The Miami Herald, February 26, illustration

1997
- "The Photorealists," Savannah College of Art and Design-The Magazine, Fall/Winter, pp. 33-34.
- Smart, Paul. "Tom Blackwell: Thriving on the Natural, On the Urban," The Mountain Eagle, August 6, Page 1, Illustration.

1996
- Bumiller, Elizabeth. "It's a Summer Thing," The New York Times, May 26
- Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1995-1996 Annual Report, p. 24 illustration.
- "Toys 'R' Art," ARTnews, March 1996, illustration

1992
- "Cooperstown Show Displays Tom Blackwell's Photorealism," Catskill Mountain News, October 28, page 9, illustration.

1991
- Harrison, Helen A. "Focusing In on Super-Realism," The New York Times, P. 11-L.I. Section, 28 April 1991
- Parks, Steve. "The Grand Museum Tour," Newsday (Nassau Edition-Part II), 3 May, pp. 84-85, 100.
- "West Coast Art at the End of This Century," Bijutso Techo, Tokyo, Japan, vol. 43, no. 640, July, p. 80, illus. p. 94.

1989
- Kover, Jonas. "Arts and Entertainment," Sunday Observer-Dispatch, Cooperstown, NY, July 23

1987
- Ligocki, Gordon. "Photorealism Holds on to 1980's Audiences," The Times, Hammond, IN, July 3, p.B-7

1986
- Raynor, Vivien. "Tom Blackwell," The New York Times, May 2
- Klien, Ellen Lee. "Tom Blackwell," Arts Magazine, May
- De Kay, Ormande. "Blackwell at Lamagna," Art/World, May

1983
- Mullaly, Terence. "Icy Reflections of Life," London Daily Telegraph

1982
- Russell, John. "Painters from Brussels," The New York Times, May 21
- "New York a Bruxelles et vice-versa," Libre Belgique, Brussels, Belgium, May 7
- Ray, Stephanie. "La Galerie Brachot et la Galerie Louis K. Meisel," Echo de la Bauru, Brussels, Belgium, May 9
- Gillemon, Daniele. "Une galerie Bruxelloise a' l'heure New Yorkaise," Le Soir, Brussels, Belgium, May 12
- Marera, Daniella. "Fotorealismo," Italian Vogue, October, pp.634-639, 700, Illustration
- "The Illusion of Reality, The Reality of Illusion," Boston After Dark, The Boston Phoenix, June 22, illustration
- Aceti, Diana. "The Fine Art of Photo Realism," Dodge National Forum, Vol.5, No.1, pp.6-9, Illustration

1981
- Yoskowitz, Robert. "Review," Arts Magazine, January, p.31
- "Photographs by the Photorealists," Arts Magazine, March, p.25
- Karmel, Pepe. "Photographs by the Photorealists," Art in America, May, p.140
- Forgey, Benjamin. "Aviation Art at Home in Its New Hangar," The Washington Star, May 21, Illustration
- "Cityscapes," The Column, Arnot Art Museum, Elmira, NY, July/August
- Perreault, John. "Photorealing in the Years," Soho Weekly News, October 20, p.64
- Portfolio, November/December, p.77 Illustration
- "Photo-Realist Aviation Art," Air Force Magazine, September, p.61 Illustration

1980
- "Contemporary and Modern Art to be Offered June 10 at Christis's East," Antiques & The Arts Weekly, June 6, p.38
- Meisel, Louis K. "Fifteen Years of Photorealism," Horizon, November, p.52 Illustration
- Chase, Linda. "Tom Blackwell, 1970-1980," Arts Magazine, December, pp.154-155 Illustration

1979
- Ratcliff, Carter. "Contemporary American Painting," Decade, January, pp.46-47, Illustration
- Loge, Qystein. "Et Nytt Salongmaleri er pa vei," Bergens Tidende, Norway, August 10, p.4
- Reif, Rita. "Auctions: Orientalia Leads the Way," The New York Times, November 16

1978
- "Acquisitions," 1978 Annual Report, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY
- Akroyd, Dan. "Heavy Metal Silence," Crawdaddy, January, pp.50-53, Illustration
- Zimmer, William. "Tom Blackwell," Arts Magazine, January, pp.24-25
- Bongard, Willie. Art Aktuell, Cologne, West Germany, April
- "For the Record," Art Gallery Magazine," Vol.XXI, #6, August-September, p.16
- "New Acquisitions," Elvehjem Museum of Art Calendar, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI September - November
- Harris, Helen. "Art and Antiques: The New Realists," Town and Country, October, pp.242,244,246-247
- Mackie, Alwynne. "New Realism and the Photographic Look," American Art Review, November, pp.72-79,132-134, Illustration
- "Photo Journalism and Photo Realism," Milwaukee Journal, Dec. 10
- Perreault, John. "Art Picks: Photo-Realist Prints," Soho Weekly News, December 14, p.54, Illustration

1977
- Edelson, Elihu. "New Realism at Museum Arouses Mixed Feelings," Jacksonville Journal, FL, February
- Ratcliff, Carter. "Remarks on the Nude," Art International, Vol.XXI, No.2, March 4, pp.60-65
- Zimmer, William. "Works on Paper," Arts Magazine, March, p.38
- Borlase, Nancy. "In Selecting a Common Domestic Object," Sydney Morning Herald, Australia, July 30
- McGrath, Sandra. "I Am Almost a Camera," The Australian, Brisbane, July 27
- R.S. "The Museum of Modern Art," Art in America, September 10, pp.93-96
- Phillips, Ralph. "Just Like the Real Thing," Sunday Mail, Brisbane, Australia, September 11
- Battcock, Gregory. "Dinner for Eighty," Soho Weekly News, Nov. 10
- "Fleigen-Ein Traum," Ruhrfestspiele, Kunsthalle, Recklinghausen, West Germany
- "A Gallery of Aviation," Pilot Magazine, December, p.66

1976
- Chase, Linda. "Photo-Realism: Post Modernist Illusionism," Art International, Vol. XX, No.3-4, March-April, pp.14-27, Illus.
- Hoffman, Donald. Kansas City Star, May
- Yankee Magazine, Vol.40, No.5, May, ill. pp.104-105
- Glasser, Penelope. "Aspects of Realism at Stratford," Art Magazine, (Totonto), Summer, Vol.7, No.28, p.22-29, Illustration
- Parker, William. "Perspectives," Monadnock Ledger, NH, July, p.5, Illustration
- "Exhibition Displays Aspects of Realism," New Westminster Columbian, British Columbia, October 9
- Artner, Alan. "Mirroring the Merits of a Showing of Photo-Realism," Chicago Tribune, October 24, Arts & Fun
- K.M. "Realism," New Art Examiner, November
- Chase, Linda. "How Much is a Painting Worth?" The New Englander, Vol.23, No.8, December, pp.54-62, Illustration
- Lamagna, Carlo. "Tom Blackwell's New Paintings," Art International, Vol.XX, No.10, December, p.22-26, Illustration
- Owen, Barbara. "For The First Time...I Like What I am Doing," Stars and Stripes, December 17, (Heidelberg, West Germany)
- Schneider, Helmut. "Heidelberg: Photo Realismus," Die Zeit, Heidelberg, December 17, p.38
- "Das Ende is Uberall," Frankfurter Rundschau, December
- Freeser, Sigrid. "Fotorealismus, eine neuw salonkunst?" Mannheimer Morgan, West Germany, December
- Schultze, Sabine. "Fleisch, Fassaden und Feuerstuble," December
- Greenwood, Mark. "Toward a Definition of Realism: Reflections on the Rothman's Exhibition," Arts/Canada, Vol.XXIV, No.210-211, December-January, pp.6-23

1975
- Russell, John. "Tom Blackwell," The New York Times, February 8, p.21
- "Goings On About Town," The New Yorker Magazine, February 24, p.8
- Ellenzweig, Allen. "Reviews," Arts Magazine, April, p.14
- "Photo-Realism Exhibit Is Opening at Paine Sunday," Oshkosh Daily Northwestern, April 17, Illustration
- Ratcliff, Carter. "Tom Blackwell at Sidney Janis," Art International, Vol.XIX, No.14, April 20, pp.56-57, Illustration
- "Photo-Realists at Paine," Post Cresent View Magazine, Appleton, WI, April 27, pp.5-6
- "Photo-Realism Flies High at Paine," Milwaukee Journal, May
- Ray Steve. "Photo/Art: Real or Reel?" Oshkosh Advance-Titan, May 1, p.19
- Battcock, Gregory. "Art in New York," Domus, June, pp.54-55, Illus.
- The Auckland Star, New Zealand, June 25, p.1, Illustration
- "Photo Realist Art to Be Shown in Dunedin," The Evening Star, Auckland, New Zealand, July 18
- "Photo Realism on the Way" Western Leader, Auckland Suborian, New Zealand, July 21
- McNamara, T.J. "Photorealist Exhibition Makes Impact," The Auckland Star, New Zealand, July 21
- Bromhead, Peter. "When is Copying Not Cheating?" Auckland Star, July 22
- Bromhead, Peter. "Going Back in Time," Auckland Star,
- "First Exhibition of Photo-Realist Art in Auckland," Auckland Tourist Times, New Zealand, July 22, p.6
- McNamara, T.J. "Photo-Realist Exhibition Makes Impact," New Zealand Herald, Auckland, July 23
- "Unique Art Exhibition," City News, New Zealand, July 23
- "Local Art Exhibition," South Auckland Courier, New Zealand, July 30
- "Photorealism Tours Our Big Centers," Manawatu Evening Standard, New Zealand, July 30
- "Photorealism," Northern Advocate, Witangare, New Zealand, Aug.4
- "Photorealism at Best," The Christchurch Star, New Zealand August 27
- Curnow, Wynston. "The Imagery of Now," New Zealand Listener, September 13
- Richard, Paul. "Whatever You Call it, Super Realism Comes On With a Flash," Washington Post, November 25, p.B1

1974
- Chase, Linda. "The Connotation of Denotation," Arts Magazine, February, pp.38-41, Illustration
- "Tom Blackwell," Goya, No.119, March-April
- Hartford Magazine, April, p.14, Illustration
- Hughes, Robert. "An Omnivorous and Literal Dependence," Arts Magazine, June, pp.25-29
- Spector, Stephen. "The Super Realists," Architectural Digest, November - December, p.85
- University of Kansas Museum of Art Calendar, December - January

1973
- Moulin, Raoul-Jean. "Hyperrealistes americains," L'Humanite, January 16
- Piradel, Jean-Louis. "Paris I: hyperrealists americains," Opus International, No.39, pp.51-52
- Hakanson, Joy. "Post-Pop Realists Break Rules-Beautifully," Detroit Sunday News, February, Illustration
- Tall, Bill. "The World of Post-Pop: Scintillating NewWave," Detroit News, February, Illustration
- "L'hyperrealisme Americain," Le Monde des Grandes Musiques, No.2, March - April, pp.4,56-57
- Chase, Linda; Foote, Nancy; and McBurnett, Ted. "Interviews with Robert Bechtle, Tom Blackewll, Chuck Close, Richard Estes and John Salt," Opus International, No.44-45, June, pp.38-50
- Chase, Linda. "Recycling Reality," Art Gallery Magazine, October, pp.75-82, Illustration
- Art Gallery Guide, September, pp.1-3
- Borgeaud, Bernard. "Hyperrealisme Americain," Pariscope, October, p.73
- Chase, Linda; and McBurnett, Ted. "Fiches - Tom Blackwell," interview translated from "The Photorealists-12 Interviews," Art in America, pp.39-53, Illustration
- Derfner, Phyllis. "New York Letter," Art International/The Lugano Review, Illustration
- Levin Kim. "The New Realism: A Synthetic Slice of Life," Opus International, Vol.44-45, pp.28-37, Illustration
- Bell, Jane. "Stuart M. Speiser Collection," Arts Magazine, December, p.57

1972
- Thornton, Gene. "These Must Have Been a Labor of Love," The New York Times, January 23
- Kramer, Hilton. "And Now, Pop Art: Phase II," The New York Times, January 16, p.14
- Marvel, Bill. "Saggy Nudes? Giant Heads? Make way for 'Superrealism'," National Observer, January 29, p.22
- Hughes, Robert. "The Realist as Corn God," Time Magazine, Jan. 31, pp.50-55
- Rosenberg, Harold. "The Art World, Reality Again," The New Yorker, February 5, pp.88-93
- Lerman, Leo. "Sharp Focus Realism," Mademoiselle Magazine, March 19, pp.170-173, Illustration
- Hickey, David. "Sharp Focus Realism," Art in America, March/April, pp.116-118
- Marmori, Giancarlo di. "Piu vero del vero," L'Espresso, No.29, June 16, pp.4-15
- "Hyperrealistes americains," Argus de la Presse, November 16
- Chase, Linda; Foote, Nancy; and McBurnett, Ted. "The Photo-Realists - 12 Interviews," Art in America, November-December, Vol.60, No.6, pp.73-89 Illustration
- Seitz, William C. "The Real and the Artificial: Painting of the New Environment," Art in America, November-December, Vol.60, No.6, pp.58-72
- Lista, Giovanni. "Iperrealisti americani," NAC, Milan, Italy, No.12, December, pp.24-25
- Warnod, Jeanine. "Le réalisme et son oeuvre," Le Figaro, Paris, France

1970
- "Living Big in a Loft," Life Magazine, pp.61-65, Illustration

1967
- Glueck, Grace. "Reviews," The New York Times, April 1, p.26

1964
- "Reviews," Artforum, April 16, p.18
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